Origin,Original Places-

  • Mr. Bhimabhai Kirparam remarks that, "After Parshurams despersion of the Kshatrias the Charans accompanied them on their Southward flight. In those trouble times Charans took charge of supplies of the Kshatria forces and so fell to their present position of cattle breeders and grain carriers'. Col.Todd says that the Charans, Bhats Bards and geneologists are the chief carriers of these regions, i.e. Marwar, their sacred character, overawes the lawless Rajput chiefs. He identifies Charans and Banjaries as follows, "Murlah is an excellent township inhabited by a community of Charans of the Tribe. Cucholia (Kachi) who are Banjaries    (carriers) by profession, though poets by birth. For thier persons being sacred the imminity extended to their goods like wise and saved the same from all impost, so that in process of time they, became the free traders of Rajputana".

  • Lamani -Brinjáries : The origin of the Lambanis is unknown perhaps even to themselves, for they acknowledge no home nor country, but their miserable huts for the time being. Vanjaris or carriers are not natives of Kathewar, they claim Rajput origin. They visit occasionally bringing grain, tobacco on long string of bullocks and returning with salt. They have large colonies in Rajasthan, Central India, always return there for rains. Owing to the fast spread of railways and roads. Their trade is fast dying out.

  • Bijapur : The main group of Banjaras belong to the Bhukia stock and claim Rajput origin. They seem to have settled in Rajputana and after that in Gujrat.
    Ahmednagar -Maharashtra : They say that they have no story of their origin and they have come from Marwar and settled in the district when and why they do not know.
    Buldhana : They claim to be of Maratha origin and yet assert that they were originally Paundraksas, a tribe, inhabiting the old Poundra country, Berar and Bengal. They however are unable to reconcile, their claim of Maratha origin, with the Bengali one, which also they claim and of which no traces in their manner, customs, and gotras now remain.

  • Saharanpur : Among the castes, not found in all parts of the provinces, and Banjaras who Chiefly belongs to the sub-mountain tract. Their homes, seem, originally to have been the long tract of the country under the northern nills from Gorakhpur to Haridwar, in Berar as in Punjab the Banjaras are generally known as Labhanas. Although the Cháran division outnumbers the Labhana, a Cháran if asked his caste will answer Labhana and if asked what Labhana will answer Charan Labhana. The Labhana or the salt carriers came from further North than the other Hindu Banjaras. Their claim to descended from Gaur Brahmanas, when coupled with details of their serpent worship, as described by Tavernier suggests that they are possibly, connected with the Gaur Taga Tribe. They are considered to be superior to the Chárans.

  • Panjab Caste Banjaras : Banjaras and Labhana castes are generally said to be identical being called Banjara in the eastern districts and Labhana in whole of the Punjab proper. The original Banjara caste seems to be inhabitant in the sub-mountainous tract from Gorakhpur to Haridwar. From Sir. Elliot's description; they seem to be a very composite class including sections of various origin.
    There is a very curious a colony of Labhans on the Lower Indus, who are said to have been settled here under Sikh rule, and who are almost all Munna Sikhs or followers of Baba Nanak.
    Though many of them have returned in Bahawalpur tables as Hindus. The abstract No. 72 (page 224) of Bahawalpur ; Labhanas were returned as Jats. The Labhanas of Jháng are said to have been returned from Jodhpur and Jaipur and to be same as Mahatam. On the whole Labhanas appear to be by origin closely allied with this if not actually, belonging to the vagrant and probably aboriginal tribes.

  • Caste & Tribes by Syed Siraj-Ul-Hasan : Banjaras claim to be descended from Mota and Mola two brothers who tended Shrikrishna's cows. From Mota sprang the ancestors of modern Marvaris, Mathuria, Banjaras and Labhana. Mola having no issue once visited the princes court with wife Radha and there exhibited the gymnastic feats in which he was adept. The prince was so pleased with Mola's skill and so charmed with Radha's beauty and grace, that he gave them as reward three infant boys of different castes, whom they adopted as their sons. In due course of time the boys grew up and were married. Their progeny has been collectively known as Cháran Banjaras.
    This account ascribing to Banjaras a mixed parentage appears to have been founded on facts. there can be no doubt that these people so varied in their characteristics were recruited from different races of Northern India and bound together by one common occupation.

  • In Dashkumars Charitra, a work written by Dandi, mention is made of a cock fighting in a Banjara camp. It is said that these grain carriers came into Deccan with Mughal armies, early in the 17th century. Their carrying has been noticed by almost all European travellers of the past three centuries. Thus Mandelson wrote of them in 1638 AD. as buying wheat and rice from the markets of Deccan towns and carrying them to Hindustan in caravans, sometimes of ten thousand animals (Mandelso in Haris page 130.)
    "Many thousands of them " says Abbe Dubois were employed by English for transporting their provisions in the las twar with Sultan of Mysore (Abbe Dubois Page.451) "They seem to have derived their origin and organisation", remarks Mr. Lyall "from the long wars of Delhi Emperors in the south, and the restoration of peace and prosperity is breaking them up. Neither trade nor their tribal system can survive another generation of English predominance."
    Prof. Hasan has given various fanciful accounts of their origin, and it is difficult to find some consistancy and significance in any of them but all agree in assigning, Northern India, probably Marwar, as their original home. They claim to be kshatriyas and to be descended from Rajput ancestors.
    Another account states that the three boys which Mola received from the prince as a reward for his skill at gymnastics, married three Brahmin sisters, who had remained unmarrie after coming of age, who had been abandoned in the jungle according to the custom of their caste. All the Banjaras are said h_origin

          Origin,Original Places-

    • Mr. Bhimabhai Kirparam remarks that, "After Parshurams despersion of the Kshatrias the Charans accompanied them on their Southward flight. In those trouble times Charans took charge of supplies of the Kshatria forces and so fell to their present position of cattle breeders and grain carriers'. Col.Todd says that the Charans, Bhats Bards and geneologists are the chief carriers of these regions, i.e. Marwar, their sacred character, overawes the lawless Rajput chiefs. He identifies Charans and Banjaries as follows, "Murlah is an excellent township inhabited by a community of Charans of the Tribe. Cucholia (Kachi) who are Banjaries    (carriers) by profession, though poets by birth. For thier persons being sacred the imminity extended to their goods like wise and saved the same from all impost, so that in process of time they, became the free traders of Rajputana".

    • Lamani -Brinjáries : The origin of the Lambanis is unknown perhaps even to themselves, for they acknowledge no home nor country, but their miserable huts for the time being. Vanjaris or carriers are not natives of Kathewar, they claim Rajput origin. They visit occasionally bringing grain, tobacco on long string of bullocks and returning with salt. They have large colonies in Rajasthan, Central India, always return there for rains. Owing to the fast spread of railways and roads. Their trade is fast dying out.

    • Bijapur : The main group of Banjaras belong to the Bhukia stock and claim Rajput origin. They seem to have settled in Rajpu